Editing The Debonaires: Part 3

Written by: Glyn Dewis

Published: July 1, 2010

Category: Videos

In this final part of ‘The Debonaires’ editing series we finish off the picture by going through a number of steps including:

  • Adding a Hue & Saturation Adjustment Layer to bring the sky to life
  • Converting the image to Black & White to Desaturate the colour in the image
  • Adding a Vignette
  • Sharpening using the High Pass Filter

Of course the techniques you see me using in these tutorials aren’t the only ones that can be used to give the same results, and that’s what I love about Photoshop…the fact that there’s not just one way to do something and you can tailor your editing techniques to your own style and preferences. In fact I’d probably go so far to say that despite my ‘favourite’ techniques each time I edit a picture I’ll try something different (depending on time).

Anyway I hope you found this 3 Part editing series useful and if you have any questions or comments about what we’ve covered then as always post them up in the ‘Comments’ section below and I’ll be sure to respond to each and every one; it’s always great to ‘hear’ your thoughts and get your feedback.

Enjoy 🙂

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10 Comments

  1. Matt Sanderson

    Great post. Always useful to see how others approach editing.

    Would you care to share why you prefer high-pass sharpening to Unsharp Mask? I used to use High-Pass Sharpening, but never really saw any difference than using Unsharp Mask – aside from the Threshold option in USM, which is why I returned to using that.

    – Matt

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Matt…Thanks for stopping by and commenting and for the kind words mate 🙂

      With regards to why I chose to use the High Pass Filter, there’s no real reason other than like I said in the post, sometimes I’ll chop and change from one technique to another. That being said I like to use the High Pass because it I can see the extent of the sharpening and the areas that it’s mainly going to affect before I apply the Soft Light Blend Mode; does that make sense?

      Again though mate, I do go from one technique to another.
      Hope that answers your question (sort of) 🙂

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  2. DaveT

    Hi Glyn,

    Great tutorial again – like the recap at the end 😉

    Cheers
    Dave

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Dave T…Cheers Buddy; glad you liked it 🙂

      Reply
  3. Tom Haider

    great tutotial. thank you.

    best regards from south germany.

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Tom…Very kind of you, thanks.

      All the best to you,
      Glyn 🙂

      Reply
  4. David Kelly

    Hi Glyn,

    Nice finishing part to the PP on this image. Great to see the before / after image recap at the end, like DaveT said. Thanks as always for your efforts in putting these videos together.

    I know you draw from a ‘dolly mixture’ pool of tools / techniques in your PP in Photoshop but the one consistent approach I see is in your use of opacity values 😉

    Take care,
    David

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @David…Great to hear you liked this series of editing videos David. I’m working on more and more; the hard thing being holding back from posting them all at one 🙂

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  5. Keith Hammond

    Top set of videos Glyn, great to see it all come together.
    Q : for the inside B & W shots in the first blog about the shoot did you just convert in your beloved Nik software or was any other tweeking involved, i remember you saying they were quick available light shots so just wondering.

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Keith…Thanks for the kind words Keith 🙂
      Re the B&W shots, there was no editing done to them apart from a B&W convert using the Nik Silver Efex Pro Plug In mate; just available light as you say.

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply

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