Grunge Effect Part 2: Editing Walk Through

Written by: Glyn Dewis

Published: July 30, 2010

Category: General

Following on from my ‘Grunge in 8 Simple Steps‘ video and post, I got the feeling from some of the feedback that a ‘walk though’ of the tutorial which would go hand in hand with the video would be useful; so, in this post I’ve done exactly that…a ‘walk through’ of each of the 8 steps to edit ‘The Bearded Guy’:

Step 1: Levels Adjustment
The ‘out of camera’ image was lacking in ‘blacks so a Levels Adjustment was made where the shadow slider was moved a short distance to the right so that it touched/lined up with the far left of the histogram.

BEFORE:

AFTER:

Step 2: Add contrast to eyes using a Levels Adjustment
To make the eyes have more impact and stand out, first of all I selected them by selecting a brush, a foreground colour of black and then pressing ‘Q’ to enter Quick Mask Mode. All I did then was paint inside the eye (which will be visible by the red overlay) and once all selected just pressed ‘Q’ again to come out of Quick Mask Mode. To saturate the colour and add more density to the eye all that was needed was a Levels Adjustment Layer and moving the Shadow, Midtone and Highlight sliders to taste.

3. Add contrast with a Curves Adjustment Layer
Contrast was then added to the image using a Curves Adjustment Layer and selecting one of the presets…’Medium Contrast’. Now, as I’ve mentioned before, adding contrast to an image does also have the effect of saturating the colours (as happened in this case). Normally this isn’t something I’d want to happen, so to remove the saturation but keep the contrast boost you can simply change the blend mode of the adjustment layer to Luminosity. However, knowing what I was doing next in Step 4, I kept the saturation as it was.

4. Reduced Greyscale Layer
To make a Greyscale (Black and White) Layer I used Nik Silver Efex Pro which nowadays is all I ever use, however you don’t need it to do this tutorial. Use any of your own preferred methods to convert the image to Greyscale so long as the result appears on it’s own layer. Once I’d created the greyscale layer all I did then was reduce the opacity so that the colour from the underlying layer started to show through just enough to give me the look I wanted, which in this case was around 75% (allowing 25% of the colour from beneath to show through).

BEFORE: Greyscale Layer

AFTER: Greyscale Layer opacity reduced to 75%

5. Restore eye colour with a Layer Mask
A side effect of adding the Greyscale layer is that the colour / tone in the eyes that we did in Step 2 is lost, so to recover it all that was needed was to create a Layer Mask and then paint in black using a brush over the eyes and the colour in the layer beneath shows through.

6. Add detail to hair using the High Pass Filter
I tend to use the High Pass Filter when I’m looking to bring out detail in such things as stubble or as in this case a ‘shaggy beard’. I’ll always apply it to a duplicated layer so that if need be I can reduce the strength of it later by reducing that layers opacity. So, all we do is go to FILTER (in the top menu bar) then OTHER…HIGH PASS. This brings up the dialogue box you can see in the image below and all you need to do is choose a RADIUS amount. The higher the radius, the more of the image you’ll see appearing through the grey overlay and consequently the more detail/sharpening will be applied.

Once you’ve chosen a Radius click OK and then you’ll need then to change the Blend Mode  to Softlight. At this stage this means the HIGH PASS Filter has been applied to the entire image but all I want is for it to be applied to the hair / beard. So, add a black Layer Mask (which hides the result of the High Pass FIlter) and then paint over the hair / beard with a white brush to bring the effect back. This way, only the hair / beard has the High Pass Filter applied to it and not the skin.

7. Darken down the background using Multiply Blend Mode and Burn Tool
Really simple this one. Just duplicate the layer you’re working on and change the blend mode to Multiply. This will have the effect of darkening the whole image so to restrict the darkening to the background etc, all I did was add a Layer Mask and then paint with a black brush over the face etc (but not the background); this will keep the darkening of the Multiply Blend Mode on the background but not on the face or wherever else you paint. In this instance to darken it even more I then dragged the Multiply Blend Mode layer onto the New Layer Icon at the bottom of the layers panel. This creates a duplicated layer and consequently duplicates (doubles) the darkening. To finish off the darkening I just used the Burn Tool set to Highlights and painted over some of the brighter areas in the background at around 20% strength.

8. Reduce Saturation
To finish off the image all I have done then is add a Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer and moved the Saturation slider to the left slightly so as to reduce the overall colour of the image.

So there you have it…the 8 Steps I went through to edit ‘The Bearded Guy’.
So, was it useful? Explained clearly? … I’d love to ‘hear’ your thoughts good or bad and any questions or comments you may have so please feel free to make use of the comments section below.

In the meantime, have a great weekend.
Enjoy 🙂

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41 Comments

  1. neil Holmes

    Hi Glyn, yes the camera calibration profiles, I used to use the Adobe Standard one, but found a set of ‘untwisted’ ones that work well as a standard and theirs not much colour shift when I use the recovery slider, I tweaked them to my own taste, usually the red primary hue to take pink out of skin tones.

    Cheers Neil

    Reply
  2. Mike

    Excellent work as always mate.

    Love the walk through as it helps slow things down a tad especially seeing how to re-create similar kind of results with CS4 instead

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Mike…Thanks for stopping by and commenting mate; really appreciate the kind words.

      Cheers 🙂

      Reply
  3. David Kelly

    Glyn,

    Thanks for the video on the previous post and the more detailed breakdown here of some critical steps. Definitely a ‘look’ that I’d very much want to use – just need to the appropriate subject 😉

    Interesting to note your & Neil’s comments re: camera calibration profiles in LR. I do use them, though tend to prefer either Neutral or Faithful (Canon picture styles). I certainly avoid the Portrait setting, which is just way to over the top in red hues for skins tones. How this could been seen as a “Portrait” setting I don’t know. Never got around as yet though to using the profiler utility that Adobe have released to come up with some custom settings.

    Regards,

    David

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @David…Thanks for stopping by and for commenting mate. I guess now is a good time to go on a mini photo walk as Neal and I did; endless subjects out there mate 🙂

      Reply
  4. Noel Hannan

    Great post Glyn, I am going to try to adapt this for my trusty old Photoshop 5 and see if it works.

    Thanks for sharing. Keep shooting.
    all the best
    Noel

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Noel…Did you say CS5???? Blimey, that might be a collectors model now 🙂
      Seriously though mate, thanks for the kind words.

      Hope all is well…must catch up soon,
      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  5. Andrew Hart

    Hi Glyn, great portrait; that guy has the 1000 yard stare going on, looks like he’s seen some stuff you just can’t ‘unsee’!

    Thanks for showing your processing, the end result is very dramatic. I’ll give it a try on a ‘suitable’ subject (lest my girlfriend leaves me!).

    You should maybe devise a quick guerilla lighting rig so you can take shots in a consistently lit manner of street people so as to do a series of portraits all given this processing treatment.
    It would make a great exhibition and perhaps help raise some funds or awareness of their plight?

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Andrew…Yeah I know what you mean about his stare mate; says alot huh!
      No worries re the processing; would be great to see what you use it on and yeah I’m liking the idea of the Guerilla lighting…might be something for NEal and me to try out on the 12th August when we head off to Bournmouth for another Mini Photo Walk.

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  6. Neal

    Cheers mate, compliments the video nicely 🙂

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Neal…Thanks mate 🙂

      Reply
  7. Tim Skipper

    This is a great tutorial. Now all I need is an old guy with a beard. Happen to know where I can find one? 😉

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Tim…I’m sure you’ll find one mate 🙂

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  8. DaveT

    Thanks for the breakdown tutorial Glyn, I really needed this extra detail to be able to take in what you did in the processing.

    More please.
    Dave

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @DaveT…You’re welcome mate; glad you like it.

      Cheers,
      Glyn

      ps> I’ll be adding more of this kind of stuff for sure 🙂

      Reply
  9. Andy Cuadra

    Glyn- what a great series my friend. I wanted to stop by and see what you were up to; looks like you have been busy :-). Awesome tutorial.

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Andy…Great to hear from you Buddy; thanks for stopping by and for commenting 🙂
      Cheers,
      Glyn

      Reply
  10. Josh Reynolds

    Hi Glyn, great tutorial. Just wondering about your settings in Silver Efex Pro. I have Silver Efex Pro, but I can’t get my greyscale to look anything like yours. Yours looks very dark and rich. Was there a particular film type you used? Are there any other settings in Silver Efex that help get that particular look?

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Josh…Hi mate. Don’t you just love Silver Efex Pro. For your info, my settings in this case were to use the High Structure Preset then tweak the contrast a tiny bit and reduce the structure…again just by maybe 2 or 3 points.

      Hope that helps 🙂

      Reply
  11. Angel

    Hey Glyn,
    Great tutorial. Glad I was able to find it. I guess from reading some of the post, you are using SEP? I didn’t think when watching your tutorial that I recognized that program that opened up for the black and white conversion. Got it! Awesome use of it. I’ve wanted it for a while. -A

    Reply
  12. Angel

    Well I’ve noticed that when I come out of the quick mask mode and create a level layer, that the whole picture is selected and the whole image is affected by the slider effect. Also, the mask is white and not black as shown in the picture or video. The mask has to be changed to black and the and the whole image has to be reverted back to local or inversed for the effect to affect only the eyes. Another step missing in the video. I’ve watched and watched and see things appearing like the red ring that flashes but there is no explanation explaining that. It’s a bit confusing.

    Reply
  13. Glyn Dewis

    Angel, ok let me address a few things here…First of all the ‘Red Flashing Ring’ … this is ‘not’ Photoshop…it is the recording software I am using so that those people watching the video can see where the cursor is. Re the Quick Mask Mode by the very nature of what you’ve written I can tell you now that you do not have the default settings in Photoshop. If you double click on the Quick Mask icon at the bottom of the tool bar a dialog box will appear…do you have ‘Selected Areas’ checked? When you are in Quick Mask Mode is your foreground color black? If it is then everything will work out fine. There are no secrets here…if I was doing something in the tutorial and not showing you then what would be the point of that? … and for that very reason that is why nothing has been left out or not explained. Regards, Glyn

    Reply
  14. Carol McCoy

    Love your work, very well explained and that is something not found often. Keep it up .

    Reply
    • Glyn

      @Carol…Very kind of you to say; thanks for that 🙂

      Reply
  15. Robertus Prihandoko

    thank you for such a clear tutorial, you share a wonderful technique

    Reply
  16. Mark

    Hey, Glyn – this tutorial is a Godsend! When I first came across your video on youtube, my hair caught fire because it was so~~ hard to follow. Thankfully, I saw your comments that led me to this link…I’ve been having a lot of fun with it! Did like 3 different self-portraits tonight, fooling around with different variants with tips I picked up on other sites…but yours tops them all. I don’t have the Silver Efex Pro, but converting to B&W and making some minor adjustments worked just fine. Also, I am using PSE9, so no Curves, but there is a variant of Curves which I used for step 3 with very pleasing results. Thanks again, I look forward to checking out the rest of your site!

    Reply
  17. Suvriti Gupta

    Thanks Glyn. Its excellent tutorials like these which are very useful for beginners like me.

    Reply
  18. Delectapix

    Great tutorial. Glad you did the walk through, the YT vid was hard to follow but well produced nonetheless.

    Reply
  19. Michael Lunny

    Tks, this was really useful to go all with your video. Very clear and exact to follow.
    Thanks again.
    Michael

    Reply
  20. Diego

    soy una persona que recien se inicia en esto encontré genial esta edición.. quiero decir que la encontré poco clara la vi muchas veces tanto escrita como video no pude avanzar demasiado.. poco clara muy muy rapido ese video tutorial.. gracias si es que algun dia lees mi comment..

    Reply
  21. Matija

    Great tutorial, but I’m having a problem at Step 2: Add contrast to eyes using a Levels Adjustment…when I select the eyes and go adjust the Levels to make them “pop out” … when I move the sliders my whole image gets adjusted not just the eyes!? What am I doing wrong?

    Reply
    • Glyn

      Matija…Thanks for stopping by and commenting. Looking at the way you describe the problem you’re having it sounds as though when you’re using the Quick Mask to select the eyes you may have it set so that you’re selecting everything else instead. Can you email me a screen grab so I can see your layers to glyn@www.glyndewis.com? We’ll get it sorted 😉

      Reply
  22. Matija

    @Glyn – damn, I feel stupid now! 😉 Changed it and now it works fine! Once again, great tutorial and will keep track of your blog! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Glyn

      Hey Matija…That’s great, thanks for letting me know 🙂

      Reply
  23. Bicke

    @Glyn,
    Tutorial is great! It is maybe little bit faster, but with power of pause i learned something 🙂 I just have one question… When you did step 7., before you used burn tool, there is 4 layers. How did you creat 4. layer? I hope you will understand what am i asking you 🙂 Greetings from Serbia! 🙂

    Reply
  24. KURT

    sorry couldn’t follow it
    im very new to photoshop and so I need to be spoon feed at this point

    Reply
  25. markos cabahit

    tnx bro! keep posting more tutorials!

    Reply
  26. alexander

    hola glyn me encantan sus diseños usted no pasa los plugins o otras heramientas de donde es usted gracias saludos

    Reply
  27. Channing

    This has probably already been asked but how can I get the greyscale layer without Nik Silver?

    Reply

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